Author: Justin Regan

  • History is Personal

    This is the third and final episode in a special mini-series profiling Holocaust educators. First, we'll hear from a German college professor who teaches classes on the Holocaust and other genocides. He says it's important to focus on the role individuals play in carrying out a genocide and that real learning happens when students get uncomfortable. Then we'll hear from two screenwriters who wrote a children's book about the Shoah. Specifically, it's through the eyes of the cat who lived with Anne Frank while she and her family were hiding from the Nazis. They say it's a 'gentle' introduction to the Holocaust and is designed to educate and empower the youth.

  • History is Personal-Transcript

    This is the episode transcript. You can listen to the episode here. (Intro) Welcome to American Rabbi Project. The podcast about American Judaism from the perspective of rabbis across the […]

  • Sharing the Silence

    Rabbi Peter Grumbacher is the child of Holocaust survivors. His father was a prisoner of Dachau who fled to the United States and then helped liberate Europe as an American Soldier. But growing up, Grumbacher's parents told him none of this. It was not uncommon for a survivor household to be a silent one. Grumbacher eventually managed to get the story from his father and today, he shares it with the world. This is the second part in a special mini-series where we hear from Holocaust educators about their thoughts on Holocaust education and remembrance today.

  • Sharing the Silence-Transcript

    This is the episode transcript. You can listen to the episode here. (Intro) Welcome to American Rabbi Project, the podcast about American Judaism from the perspective of rabbis across the […]

  • Ms. Strobel Weaves History

    Trudie Strobel was four when the Nazis came for her and her mother. During the Holocaust (also called 'the Shoah'), Strobel's mother used her skills as a seamstress to keep them alive. And it was this craft that saved Strobel again later in life when she had a complete breakdown due to the trauma of her childhood. Today Strobel is an embroiderer who uses art to tell her story and to educate newer generations about the tragedies of the past. This is part of a special mini series where we hear from Holocaust educators about their thoughts on Holocaust education in an age where the knowledge of the Shoah seems to be fading.

  • Ms. Strobel Weaves History-Transcript

    This is the episode transcript. You can listen to the episode here. In this episode I talk to a Holocaust survivor about her story and her experiences as an educator […]

  • Maryland: Strong Deeds Gentle Words-Transcript

    This is the episode transcript. You can listen to the episode here. (Intro) Welcome to American Rabbi Project. The podcast about American Judaism from the perspective of rabbis across the […]

  • Maryland: Strong Deeds Gentle Words

    Rabbi Haim Ovadia has served at synagogues all over the world, from Israel, to Columbia, to the United States. Today he teaches online, speaks around the world and performs and preserves Iraqi-Jewish songs. In this episode, Ovadia talks about making Halacha (Jewish law) more relevant, his Sephardic upbringing and how Jews in the U.S. can "open up" more to the bigger American culture.

  • Pennsylvania: Out of Egypt-Transcript

    This is the episode transcript. You can listen to the episode here. (Intro) Welcome to American Rabbi Project. The podcast about American Judaism from the perspective of rabbis across the […]

  • Pennsylvania: Out of Egypt

    Rabbi Albert Gabbai used to dream of visiting Philadelphia when he was a kid growing up in Cairo, Egypt. After fleeing imprisonment and harassment in the country of his birth, he would eventually make it to the United States and to the pulpit of Philly's Synagogue of the American Revolution. Gabbai talks about his life, his congregation and the importance of tradition in this episode of American Rabbi Project