Author: Justin Regan

  • Washington: Bimah and Beats

    Seattle, Washington has one of the largest communities of Sephardic Jews in the U.S. Rabbi Simon Benzaquen has been serving this community for 36 plus years. In addition to his typical rabbinical duties, he's also part of a Ladino hip-hop group, that is putting a modern twist on classic songs. He says the ancient romanzas they perform were written by the Sephardim to articulate the pain and loss of being expelled from their homeland during The Inquisition. Benzaquen talks about the importance of preserving the Ladino language, and the role rap can play in that mission in this music-heavy season 2 finale of American Rabbi Project.

  • Washington: Bimah and Beats-Transcript

    This is the episode transcript. You can listen to the episode here. (Preamble) This is the final episode of Season 2. I loved this season, and I hope you did […]

  • The Festival of Freedom-Transcript

    This is the episode transcript. You can listen to the episode here. (Intro) Welcome to American Rabbi Project. The Podcast about American Judaism from the perspective of rabbis across the […]

  • The Festival of Freedom

    In this year's Passover episode rabbis from around the country share some of their favorite memories of the holiday.

  • Behind the Scenes-Transcript

    This is the episode transcript. You can listen to the episode here. (Intro) Welcome to American Rabbi Project. The Podcast about American Judaism from the perspective of rabbis across the […]

  • Behind the Scenes

    In this special episode, go behind the scenes and hear from Justin and various members of his editorial team as they talk about the podcast, the creative process, why they do what they do and answer some of the most common questions asked about the podcast. So wash your hands and listen in as the American Rabbi Project team tells you how, and why, the (kosher) sausage gets made.

  • History is Personal

    This is the third and final episode in a special mini-series profiling Holocaust educators. First, we'll hear from a German college professor who teaches classes on the Holocaust and other genocides. He says it's important to focus on the role individuals play in carrying out a genocide and that real learning happens when students get uncomfortable. Then we'll hear from two screenwriters who wrote a children's book about the Shoah. Specifically, it's through the eyes of the cat who lived with Anne Frank while she and her family were hiding from the Nazis. They say it's a 'gentle' introduction to the Holocaust and is designed to educate and empower the youth.

  • History is Personal-Transcript

    This is the episode transcript. You can listen to the episode here. (Intro) Welcome to American Rabbi Project. The podcast about American Judaism from the perspective of rabbis across the […]

  • Sharing the Silence

    Rabbi Peter Grumbacher is the child of Holocaust survivors. His father was a prisoner of Dachau who fled to the United States and then helped liberate Europe as an American Soldier. But growing up, Grumbacher's parents told him none of this. It was not uncommon for a survivor household to be a silent one. Grumbacher eventually managed to get the story from his father and today, he shares it with the world. This is the second part in a special mini-series where we hear from Holocaust educators about their thoughts on Holocaust education and remembrance today.

  • Sharing the Silence-Transcript

    This is the episode transcript. You can listen to the episode here. (Intro) Welcome to American Rabbi Project, the podcast about American Judaism from the perspective of rabbis across the […]